Revised Essay

Relationships between Profile Pictures and Personality

With its exploding popularity and easy accessibility, the selfie has dominated American culture since 2012. For most of the 20th century, photography was defined as a captured memory which often took much time to create. Within the digital era, digital cameras came about and made it much easier to view, click, and erase images. Social networks soon evolved eventually turning profile pictures into a popular concept as well as taking a selfie. Because of the era of technology and social media, the modern selfie is the perfect way to express or demonstrate how one is feeling. Pictures posted on social media or dating agencies effect one’s likeability allowing others to see one’s true self through a picture.

In terms of communication and networking, social networking sites have become a popular medium for people of all ages. Along with the provided information the user decides to share, valuable information can be discovered through an analysis of one’s profile picture; users can display different versions of themselves allowing them to express their true or fake selves.

Analyzing people by their profile pictures should consist of the “Big Five personality traits: extraversion, agreeableness, openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism” (Rutkin n.p.). The Big Five factors each consist of multiple narrow personality traits called facets. Evidence suggests that the Big Five, or Five Factor Model, contains “extraversion and openness as the strongest predictors” (Start Managing n.p.); conscientiousness, neuroticism, and agreeableness only correlated with a few social networking sites. Because women on average score higher than men within the categories of neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness, “such differences might imply the possibility of gender moderation of personality effects” (Kaplan n.p.). People who are considered to be dominant within the conscientious trait express emotions of all the different personality types. Openness is often linked with creativity whereas extraversion is complete surrounded by others. Ones that are consumed by neuroticism are hidden behind a blank expression in contrast to highly agreeable people that are bright and lively.

Status updates are one of the most popular features on Facebook; individuals with different dominant traits can be measured through their posting frequencies as well as their profile pictures. Because “social networking sites are unique environments, [they] provide users with a platform that allows them to communicate with others in a mediated space” (Kapidzic n.p.). Since profile pictures play such an important role in one’s first impressions, there is often a lot of thought and consideration when choosing a photo. Often, photos are chosen because they meet the body ideal as well as people’s expectations of beauty. The main goal of one’s profile picture is to show their personality ultimately giving them the ability to be perceived as the person they want to be known as.

Decades of research have indicated that color can affect a human’s emotions and perceptions. Although the influence of the effect is still unknown, it has been determined that specific colors have an effect on human perception and memory.  According to a recent study performed in 2011, men seem to perceive women more attractive when wearing the color red in a profile picture. When the woman was placed in front of a red background, “the model’s attractiveness was rated statistically higher than [others]” (Jung n.p.). Historically, red was figured as a symbol of femininity; today it is apprehended as a color associated with sexual desire. Not only does color emotionally affect us, but it attracts us as well. Not only is color the first thing the human eye focuses on, but “the way in which colors are combined also elicits different responses” (Dustman n.p.). When asked, one will categorize colors such as orange, red, and yellow as warm colors; blue and green are associated with cool tones. By seeing these colors prevalent in a profile picture on a dating agency or a social media site, one can connect their feelings towards the person based on their feelings towards the colors and the vibes they set off. If the color pink is seen worn in a profile picture, the person can be described as youthful, insecure, and or innocent. With further research from Reneé Dustman, yellow is associated with happiness or friendliness whereas green is inviting and describes the person as earthy and patient. Blue relates to melancholy feelings towards the individual where their personality may be passive yet thoughtful. If one wants to be uncommonly memorable within the crowd of applicants, blue was “rated statistically higher than the other color condition groups” (Jung n.p.). Color hues acting as human behavioral determinants influences perceptions that are not necessarily obvious in profile pictures.

Displayed in profile pictures, a person’s stance, outfit, expression, or even background can display information that words cannot. Within three conducted studies, a hypothesis was stated that “women who use red clothing to communicate sexual interest in men in profile pictures on dating websites” (Elliot n.p.) are more interested in casual sex with an unfamiliar partner; this research shows a functional use in color in women’s sexual self-presentation. Women often use a behavioral display of red to signal their sexual interest in men; therefore, a provocative parallel between women and social profiles relates to the mating game. The color red is “designed to communicate a message to male receivers” (Elliot n.p.). The color of one’s clothing can portray a vibe to a worthy competitor; sexual attraction has documented that color has important context-specific effects on humans.

Selfies are a global phenomenon; the enormous amount of self-portrait images taken and shared on social media has revolutionized the way people introduce themselves. Depending on what is displayed in the photo, differences between the Big Five personality traits can be distinguished allowing psychoanalysis of the individual. Even without the knowledge of the distinguishers, one can determine their liking of that particular person; one’s true self can be displayed for all to witness and judge.

 

Works Cited

Dustman, Renée. “The True and Connotative Meaning of Color.” Inside PageMaker 08 2005:       8. ProQuest. Web. 5 Dec. 2017 .

Elliot, Andrew J., and Adam D. Pazda. “Dressed for Sex: Red as a Female Sexual Signal in           Humans.” PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science,             journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0034607.

Jung, Ilyung, et al. “Red for Romance, Blue for Memory.” SpringerLink, Spriger, Berlin,    Heidelberg, 9 July 2011, link.spriger.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-642-22098-     2_57?Ll=true.

Kapidzic, Sanja and Nicole Martins. “Mirroring the Media: The Relationship between Media       Consumption, Media Internalization, and Profile Picture Characteristics on Facebook.”            Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, vol. 59, no. 2, June 2015, pp. 278-297.          EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/08838151.2015.1029127.

Kaplan, Simona C., et al. “Social Anxiety and the Big Five Personality Traits: The Interactive        Relationship of Trust and Openness.” Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, vol. 44, no. 3, Apr.          2015, pp. 212-222. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/16506073.2015.1008032.

Rutkin, Aviva. “Social Media Profile Pics Reveal Your Personality.” New Scientist May 2016: 22. ProQuest. Web. 14 Nov. 2017 .

“Start managing your projects on the OSF today.” OSF | The Big Five Personality Traits, Big Two           Metatraits and Social Media: A Meta-Analysis, osf.io/6n4gr/.

 

References

“CONTAGION: How the ‘selfie’ became a social epidemic.” Fortune,         fortune.com/2014/08/22/contagion-selfie-narcissism-to-visual-language/.

Elliot, Andrew J., and Adam D. Pazda. “Dressed for Sex: Red as a Female Sexual Signal in           Humans.” PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science,             journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0034607.

Kapidzic, Sanja and Nicole Martins. “Mirroring the Media: The Relationship between Media       Consumption, Media Internalization, and Profile Picture Characteristics on Facebook.”            Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, vol. 59, no. 2, June 2015, pp. 278-297.          EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/08838151.2015.1029127.

Kaplan, Simona C., et al. “Social Anxiety and the Big Five Personality Traits: The Interactive        Relationship of Trust and Openness.” Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, vol. 44, no. 3, Apr.          2015, pp. 212-222. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/16506073.2015.1008032.

Rutkin, Aviva. “Social Media Profile Pics Reveal Your Personality.” New Scientist May 2016: 22. ProQuest. Web. 14 Nov. 2017 .

“Start managing your projects on the OSF today.” OSF | The Big Five Personality Traits, Big Two           Metatraits and Social Media: A Meta-Analysis, osf.io/6n4gr/.

Stillman, Jessica. “What Your Profile Picture Says About Your Personality, According to Science.”           Inc.com, Inc., www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/what-your-profile-picture-says-about-your-           personality-according-to-science.html.

 

 

Revised Digital Project – Analyzing Selfies

For my revised digital project, I decided to go along the lines of profile pictures and the information that can be retained from it. In my updated essay, I stated that each person displays one of the Big Five personality  traits depending on the characteristics of themselves and what they display online. By doing further research, not only does color tell psychological factors of one’s self, but so does a person’s stance or outfit.

Instead of using Voyant tools for each blog post I created, I thought I would ask a few friends to send me selfies of themselves; with my newly retained information on the hidden messages behind profile pictures, I will hopefully be able to tell information about them that others cannot.

This is my suite mate, Crista, and she is wearing a blue top in her selfie. Because she is wearing a cool toned shirt that is very modest, she will most likely be considered memorable due to the hue and style of the shirt. She is sitting in her car; she could have been bored at a red light or just could not miss the perfect lighting.

Brooke, a close friend of mine on the soccer team at UMW, has a bubbly personalty as well as a funny sense of humor. Since her shirt is white, her hair style catches more attention along with her smirky smile. It could be perceived as if she does not necessarily care very much about her appearance, but can also be taken as a very comical and outgoing girl with an energetic.

My roommate, Jesse, is not one to take selfies that are funny. She recently died her hair in this photo and was uncomfortable taking a “serious selfie” to showcase her new color to her friends. If this photo was to be used as a profile picture, it can be assumed that she is very patriotic and full of spirit once the outer shy-shell is broken. Her forehead is cut off which shows some sort of insecurity with herself.

 

Quitting Twitter

In an article from aNewDomain, a man by the name of Dennis D. McDonald quit twitter three weeks ago and wrote about his experience.

Within his progress report, the most obvious change in his post-twitter life was the quality of his work day. McDonald was much more productive during the day because he was not constantly checking his timeline and responding to ruthless Trump tweets; all of the reading, retweeting, and responding to tweets wasted much of his time.

He also claims that he is less stressed because he is not keeping up with Trump’s misbehaviors and lies; he does not feel less informed about information within the world. Because technology and social media is so fast paced, McDonald figured that he would hear about any tragic or important stories on the news later in the day – his wife is also watches the news religiously.

Quitting twitter did not justify his concern about the speed at which Twitter and social media networks are spreading large amounts of misinformation, partial truths, conspiracy theories, and lies. He claims he can now focus on more important issues rather than create arguments between anti Trump and pro Trump facts. Not engaging in online feuds created a distance from Twitter and McDonald that he is very pleased with the results.

Black Friday

Right after Thanksgiving dinner, my family and I usually sit around after dessert and look through the black Friday deals in the newspapers. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve noticed that shopping has been predominately technology based and has become a less stressful experience for the shoppers. Customers accentuate the hassle of shopping at midnight even though most of the wanted items are already out-of-stock after the midnight rush of shoppers.

As technology is progressing rapidly, companies such as Wal-Mart, Target, and Best Buy made heavy investments into e-commercials and adds on social media sites, Amazon pop-ups, and even old fashioned email subscriptions. Many customers became very angry with the big name companies due to false advertising on the adds.

A recent article on MarketWatch told the story of the tragic fake iPhone X news. As many customers drove to numerous Wal-Marts due to an add clearly stating that the iPhone X would be available for in-store purchases, shoppers became very disappointed after waiting for hours at the technology activation stand. The store only claimed to carry iPhone 8 and 8 pluses; many customers were very aggravated.

On Target’s Facebook page, there were many complaints from customers who couldn’t figure out which stores were open and their specific hours of operation during this hectic “holiday.”

Because social media is so widely used by everyone across the nation, staying at home and joining the growing ranks of those shopping online beats the in person madness. Although many staff members of the big name stores received the worst end of the customer frustration, it seemed like the companies were making an attempt to respond to the complaints made on social media.

 

Romantic Relationships over the Holidays

During the holiday season, many people often have an extended amount of time off of work – this means they have more time to spend with their family and loved ones. It is such a joyous feeling to have all of one’s family and friends in one place at the same time; all of this time off can result in some serious thinking and life doubts. This break and time away from work makes a person reflect upon their life, especially around the holiday season when giving gifts to your loved ones is such a rewarding feeling.

Some couples make if through the holidays whereas some crack under pressure and cannot handle the true definition of a dedicated couple over the long few weeks. Because so many jewelry commercials, specifically ones focusing on engagement rings, and couple expectations rise over the next few months (late November – early February), reality hits home in certain partners making them come to the realization that they cannot handle the commitment, especially over the holidays.

The holiday season is prime time to promise and reassure one’s love for each other. The pressure of the holiday season can spike jewelry sales, hotel room occupancies, dating agency accounts and profiles, and even gym memberships. Much pressure is brought upon couples around the holiday season, especially on social media. Many family members like to reconnect and know what it going on with each other’s significant partner. If one is not constantly posting about everything they are doing with their time off around the joyous season, people begin to question the strength of the relationship and may even break bonds between the couple. Self-doubt and questioning becomes an issue, not mentioning the reconnecting of strange family relatives that may to necessarily get along with one’s potential life partner.

There is always the possibility of breaking relationships over the holidays, but there is also the one individual who just wants someone to love and kiss on New Year’s Eve. Not all love is bad over the holidays, but a breakup can be escalated very quickly due to the pressure of social media, family, and societal norms.

Research Essay

Relationships between Profile Pictures and Personality

            With its exploding popularity and easy accessibility, the selfie has dominated American culture since 2012. For most of the 20th century, photography was defined as a captured memory which often took much time to create. Within the digital era, digital cameras came about and made it much easier to view, click, and erase images. Social networks soon evolved eventually turning profile pictures into a popular concept as well as taking a selfie. Because of the era of technology and social media, the modern selfie is the perfect way to express or demonstrate how one is feeling. Pictures posted on social media or dating agencies effect one’s likeability allowing others to see one’s true self through a picture.

In terms of communication and networking, social networking sites have become a popular medium for people of all ages. Along with the provided information the user decides to share, valuable information can be discovered through an analysis of one’s profile picture; users can display different versions of themselves allowing them to express their true or fake selves.

Analyzing people by their profile pictures should consist of the “Big Five personality traits: extraversion, agreeableness, openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism” (Rutkin n.p.). The Big Five factors each consist of multiple narrow personality traits called facets. Evidence suggests that the Big Five, or Five Factor Model, contains “extraversion and openness as the strongest predictors” (Start Managing n.p.); conscientiousness, neuroticism, and agreeableness only correlated with a few social networking sites. Because women on average score higher than men within the categories of neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness, “such differences might imply the possibility of gender moderation of personality effects” (Kaplan n.p.). People who are considered to be dominant within the conscientious trait express emotions of all the different personality types. Openness is often linked with creativity whereas extraversion is complete surrounded by others. Ones that are consumed by neuroticism are hidden behind a blank expression in contrast to highly agreeable people that are bright and lively.

Status updates are one of the most popular features on Facebook; individuals with different dominant traits can be measured through their posting frequencies as well as their profile pictures. Because “social networking sites are unique environments, [they] provide users with a platform that allows them to communicate with others in a mediated space” (Kapidzic n.p.). Since profile pictures play such an important role in one’s first impressions, there is often a lot of thought and consideration when choosing a photo. Often, photos are chosen because they meet the body ideal as well as people’s expectations of beauty. The main goal of one’s profile picture is to show their personality ultimately giving them the ability to be perceived as the person they want to be known as.

Displayed in profile pictures, a person’s stance, outfit, expression, or even background can display information that words cannot. Within three conducted studies, a hypothesis was stated that “women who use red clothing to communicate sexual interest in men in profile pictures on dating websites” (Elliot n.p.) are more interested in casual sex with an unfamiliar partner; this research shows a functional use in color in women’s sexual self-presentation. Women often use a behavioral display of red to signal their sexual interest in men; therefore, a provocative parallel between women and social profiles relates to the mating game. The color red is “designed to communicate a message to male receivers” (Elliot n.p.). The color of one’s clothing can portray a vibe to a worthy competitor; sexual attraction has documented that color has important context-specific effects on humans.

Selfies are a global phenomenon; the enormous amount of self-portrait images taken and shared on social media has revolutionized the way people introduce themselves. Depending on what is displayed in the photo, differences between the Big Five personality traits can be distinguished allowing psychoanalysis of the individual. Even without the knowledge of the distinguishers, one can determine their liking of that particular person; one’s true self can be displayed for all to witness and judge.

 

 

Works Cited

Elliot, Andrew J., and Adam D. Pazda. “Dressed for Sex: Red as a Female Sexual Signal in           Humans.” PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science,             journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0034607.

Kapidzic, Sanja and Nicole Martins. “Mirroring the Media: The Relationship between Media       Consumption, Media Internalization, and Profile Picture Characteristics on Facebook.”            Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, vol. 59, no. 2, June 2015, pp. 278-297.          EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/08838151.2015.1029127.

Kaplan, Simona C., et al. “Social Anxiety and the Big Five Personality Traits: The Interactive        Relationship of Trust and Openness.” Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, vol. 44, no. 3, Apr.          2015, pp. 212-222. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/16506073.2015.1008032.

Rutkin, Aviva. “Social Media Profile Pics Reveal Your Personality.” New Scientist May 2016: 22. ProQuest. Web. 14 Nov. 2017 .

“Start managing your projects on the OSF today.” OSF | The Big Five Personality Traits, Big Two           Metatraits and Social Media: A Meta-Analysis, osf.io/6n4gr/.

 

References

“CONTAGION: How the ‘selfie’ became a social epidemic.” Fortune,         fortune.com/2014/08/22/contagion-selfie-narcissism-to-visual-language/.

Elliot, Andrew J., and Adam D. Pazda. “Dressed for Sex: Red as a Female Sexual Signal in           Humans.” PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science,             journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0034607.

Kapidzic, Sanja and Nicole Martins. “Mirroring the Media: The Relationship between Media       Consumption, Media Internalization, and Profile Picture Characteristics on Facebook.”            Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, vol. 59, no. 2, June 2015, pp. 278-297.          EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/08838151.2015.1029127.

Kaplan, Simona C., et al. “Social Anxiety and the Big Five Personality Traits: The Interactive        Relationship of Trust and Openness.” Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, vol. 44, no. 3, Apr.          2015, pp. 212-222. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/16506073.2015.1008032.

Rutkin, Aviva. “Social Media Profile Pics Reveal Your Personality.” New Scientist May 2016: 22. ProQuest. Web. 14 Nov. 2017 .

“Start managing your projects on the OSF today.” OSF | The Big Five Personality Traits, Big Two           Metatraits and Social Media: A Meta-Analysis, osf.io/6n4gr/.

Stillman, Jessica. “What Your Profile Picture Says About Your Personality, According to Science.”           Inc.com, Inc., www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/what-your-profile-picture-says-about-your-           personality-according-to-science.html.

 

 

Connections Throughout Readings

As a freshman attending the University of Mary Washington, all incoming students are required to take an FSEM class (first-year seminar class). Within these various courses available, the students and professors discuss among a fairly small class about whatever the topic of the class is based on. For myself, my FSEM is titled “Beyond the Selfie.” In this class, we create our own domain, subdomain – the one I am currently blogging on – and also talk about our digital identities on and offline. We each were given the opportunity to choose our subdomain topics, mine involving relationships and happiness through the internet.

On Monday, October 29th, my class had a discussion regarding a reading our professor assigned us; the excerpt was titled “Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet.” The author, Lisa Nakamura, is an Asian woman who is a leading scholar in the examination of race, gender, and culture within digital media. Her piece focused mainly on 3 subject areas: identity tourism, avatars, and racial passing.

Defined in the passage, identity tourism relates to learned stereotypes by searching online for information. Written in the text, Nakamura describes identity tourism as people performing their version of their ideal self that allows conformity to familiar stereotypes. This often does not start questions or raise difficult issues but rather widens the gap between the user and informer in cyberspace. With these learned stereotypes, people will be quick to make judgments and assumptions based on their gender, race, or culture within online dating sites and social media apps.

 What are your thoughts on these profiles pictures with the learned stereotypes already in mind? 

An avatar is a graphic rendition of one’s self; Nakamura defines a graphic avatar as theatrical prostheses within cyberspace. Relating to relationships and happiness, online dating profiles require avatars, or profile pictures, to be viewed by other contenders with the same relationship status. Avatars are also prevalent within social media apps such as Bitmoji on Snapchat.

Identity with the ability to be pulled into question is stated in the reading as racial passing. Racial passing is condoned because it does not threaten the integrity of a national sense of self or identity. An example of this related to the section on any profile of some sort that states “about me.” This section in every profile/ dating agency websites enables a self-description; people that view the profile are able and encouraged to question the information shared on this section.

Social media and online dating agencies play a big role in finding love; Lisa Nakamura’s short essay explains cybertypes with 3 main categories which also relate to happiness online; love can be defined through race, ethnicity, and identity on the internet.

 

 

 

 

Lisa Nakamura’s website – https://lisanakamura.net

Nakamura’s article “Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet” – https://canvas.umw.edu/files?verifier=khYx5jFjcTdc4n7VSkrL4SZSMJZDKZbJVdFWKjeA&preview=65583057

Artist Statement

Throughout these past few weeks of discovering my subdomain topic and what interests me the most through the subtopics of digital media, I chose to find more information within the field of relationships and happiness. After much consideration, I decided on my thesis stating that social media and technology can be the answer for finding love (http://relationships.jennaholland.net ).

I am not one who willingly posts about my daily life on social media let alone my relationship. I also have never had a blog website discussing something that interests me, so there are a lot of firsts put forth in the making of this project. I have found that my blog posts resemble my scatterbrain and can become out of order at times. I have created two files within my subdomain thus far: social media and research files. I have noticed myself not posting as much as I would like to under the social media folder, but the research folder is slowly becoming denser with information regarding various dating websites and social media sites.

As far as research is concerned, I have learned an awful amount of useless information regarding online dating agencies and their secrets for how they “match” someone. Back in the 1990s, speed dating was at its peak and dominated the charts for successful dating rates. Because people’s lives are so busy and hectic nowadays, speed dating was created to minimize the phone calls and love letters sent back and forth. Although speed dating did quickly die off, one true thing remained – first impressions are everything (http://relationships.jennaholland.net/research/speed-dating-online-dating/ ). Because of the advanced technology and social media available today, speed dating quickly became something of the past and transitioned to the era of the “swipe right” phase.

Tinder, known as the hookup app, has over 50 million active users. By simply swiping right on someone’s profile, it alerts the user of the viewers interest and gives them the opportunity to direct message them. The main point I tried to convey within that blog post related to the idea that Tinder and other online dating agencies do not differ from the general population; Tinder is doing just as well as official dating websites (http://relationships.jennaholland.net/research/tinder-vs-online-dating-agencies/ ).

Over time, a growing number of adults have been using online dating sites and the key is to incorporate new technological advancements with a little bit of old school romance. The internet enables them to have a larger pool of applicants and allows for a convenient way to meet people. Although dating online is more likely among young and middle-aged adults, older adults are more likely to go online and search for a potential life partner (http://relationships.jennaholland.net/research/mid-life-romance/ ).

The last category I researched involved social media, specifically Facebook. I found it very intriguing that millennials take such joy within the simple act of liking a picture or receiving comments. On social media, relationships are usually blown out of proportion and may seem livelier then they actually are. Social media has been in my life since I can remember and is almost used a memory book filled with past relationships and lovers (http://relationships.jennaholland.net/research/facebook-love/ ).

The description and explanation for my digital tools are located on my subdomain (http://relationships.jennaholland.net/research/explanation-of-interactive-tools/ ).

 

 

Most helpful resources:

“Dating Apps and Websites: 60% of People Think they can Find True Love Online.” PR NewswireFeb 09 2017. ProQuest. Web. 4 Oct. 2017 .

 

Ansari, Aziz and Charlotte Alter. “Love in the Age of Like.” Time, vol. 185, no. 22, 15 June 2015, p. 40. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=103066216&site=ehost-live.

 

Bacon, Jonathan. “How Online Dating Won the Heart of the Nation.” Marketing Week (Online Edition), 11 Feb. 2015, p. 9. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=100957377&site=ehost-live.

 

Gatter, Karoline, and Kathleen Hodkinson. “Directory of Open Access Journals.” Cogent Psychology, Cogent OA, 1 Dec. 2016, doaj.org/article/f5b39477c2804630b31e0cadc42fd275.

 

Johnson, L. (2015, Nov 30). Tinder. Adweek, 56, 44. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.umw.edu/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/1748583071?accountid=12299

 

“Author Says Finding Mid-Life Romance has Never been Easier.” PR NewswireApr 18 2012. ProQuest. Web. 12 Oct. 2017 .

 

“Dating Website and App Use Statistics.” Statistic Brain, 20 July 2016, www.statisticbrain.com/dating-website-and-app-use-statistics/.

 

Rowe, J. W., & Kahn, R. L. (1997). Successful aging. The Gerontol- ogist, 37(4), 433–440. doi:10.1093/geront/37.4.433

 

Benson, Elisa. “Facebook Love.” Seventeen, vol. 70, no. 1, Dec2010/Jan2011, p. 116. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=55749271&site=ehost-live.

 

Explanation of Interactive Tools

Within my shared posts under my research file, I added media that contributes to a visual message based off of the main points specific to that blog post. After reading each blog post and conrtibuting about 3 minutes to understanding the main points and messages conveyed in each category, hopefully the reader will have a different perspective of dating online.

I for one believe that love exists online and technology and social media are just there to give us a little nudge in the right direction. After research throughout several topics of social media and technology, I found that a visual of the main words I want to get across in my topic of the blog post help convey the importance and of those specific words.

For the topics of “Speed Dating and Online Dating” as well as “Mid-Life Romance,” I decided to do a visual image with the help from voyant-tools.org. I used the cirrus setting for the display images and picked the amount of words that suited the blog post itself. For the first topic regarding speed dating, I decided not to include so many words because there really is not much put into speed dating nowadays. For the topic discussing mid-life romances, I added more words to emphasize the many people that fall under that category and the open opportunities available online disregarding age.

Under the topic of “Tinder Vs Online Dating” and “Facebook Love,” I used voyant-tools.org again and used the links visual. I chose this visual demonstration because there was much more information and detail wrapped up into the topics. All of the main categories can be related and connected to subtopics within the same category. Within the 3 minutes spent reading and understanding the visuals, the reader should be able to distinguish the similarities and differences between each link of words and ideas related to the topic of the blog post.

Facebook Love

Between all forms of social media, especially Facebook, relationships are usually blown out of proportion and may seem more lively then they actually are. Since social media has basically been is millennials’ whole lives, it is hard to imagine what life would be like without Facebook. Social media is with people through every milestone of their life and can be considered a memory book throughout the years. The memories and feelings associated with Facebook may also be contributed to the change connected with love on social media.

In today’s day and age, a simple post on a Facebook wall or the sight of that specific person’s name on a phone is considered sparking interest into one another. Trading messages back and forth is much easier than talking face-to-face; the awkward silence is avoided and there is much more time to think about responses that would like to be heard.

Because 40% of girls check their Facebook crush’s profile more than once a day, it is important to them that the public knows of their relationship. Once a relationship is announced on Facebook, it is known as a big deal due to the subtle announcement to family and close loves ones.

A public social media profile can display information about someone’s interests and likes. For example, a person who commonly changes their profile picture’s are known as looking for attention and are commonly talked about as desperate. Not everything is known about someone from their profile, but one can realize how easy it is to be fooled online.

 

Resources:

Benson, Elisa. “Facebook Love.” Seventeen, vol. 70, no. 1, Dec2010/Jan2011, p. 116. EBSCOhost, ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=55749271&site=ehost-live.